Enviromental

Get your local sustainably grown organic food here!

Loft Market

I am proud to announce that Beaver Creek is now a depot for Loft Market! Every Thursday between 3:45pm and 7:00pm you can arrange to have a bundle of fresh local produce delivered to Beaver Creek for pickup.

There are 2 different sizes and they have also added and option of a local/nonlocal box that includes some non local organic fruits.

This year they have included community bags at the depots if there is something in your bag you do not like. You can swap it out for something more to your liking. As always they include recipes that week for something new in your bag that maybe you aren’t sure what to do with.

I have been getting Loft Boxes since last year and have been really enjoying them and now will be able to walk down to our Community Centre to pick it up!

For more info check it out at http://loftmarket.ca/

Come Out and Help Naturalize the Creek

CAJ sapling two leaves

This is your invitation to come out and help plant baby trees and bushes. After submitting a proposal to the president of the University of Waterloo, we have been granted permission to:

Naturalize the Creek at Bearinger and Pinebush with indigenous species of trees and shrubbery.

If you and your family would like to take part in this exciting event, grab a shovel and meet us.

  • Where: the corner of Bearinger and Pinebush
  • When: next Saturday, April 17 at 9:30 a.m.
  • Why: Our new trees and shrubs will provide food and shelter to wildlife that lives by the Creek.

We are inviting all members of Beaver Creek, as well as our Lakeshore neighbours, to come out and participate in this exciting endeavour.

Hope to see you there!!

Free Local Computer Recycling

computer_recycling.gif

Disposing of “e-waste” (computers and other electronic equipment) can be a big pain. The Region of Waterloo offers some alternatives. The first suggestion costs money, there are a handful of brand specific options, and the last option is to “arrange with other e-waste recyclers/refurbishers”.

One such e-waste recycler is The Computer Recycling Depot, a certified member of the Ontario Electronic Stewardship, is located just across the street from the Waterloo landfill site on the property of the History Hergott Ciderr Mill. They allow you to drop off an unlimited amount of phase 1 e-waste for free such as:

  • Desktop computers
  • Portable computers
  • Computer peripherals
  • Monitors
  • Televisions
  • Printing devices

Learn more about The Computer Recycling Depot at their website including hours of operation and information about their pick up program!

Local Organic Fair Trade: LOFTmarket.ca

LOFTmarket.ca

There are a handful of people at Beaver Creek that are really excited about LOFT: local organic fair trade. It is a local co-op that consists of farmers right in our own backyard. We are hoping to get enough interest in the local area to allow us to have a LOFT drop here at Beaver Creek. Just think, your order of fresh, organic, fair trade fruits and veggies delivered to Beaver Creek every week ready for you to pick up and enjoy. You can learn more at LOFTmarket.ca

Order options include:

  • The Family Box ($37): Similar to last season’s box, this box will contain a variety of vegetables and fruits for a small family or two hungry adults.
  • The Loft Bag ($25): This easy to handle bag will offer slightly smaller portions than the Family Box while still offering you an assortment of weekly fresh greens.
  • The Heavy Box ($50): This box is heavy!! A new addition this season for those who love to cook with vegetables. If veggies are your staple then this box is for you.

If we have at least ten orders, LOFT will make Beaver Creek a drop depot. Please email me at Jonathan.Dietrich@beavercreek.coop if you are interested in placing an order for pickup at Beaver Creek.

Growing Diversity

Member in the Gardens

Walking up to the garden plots early in the morning, before many others are up in the community, and finding other gardeners quietly enjoying the fresh morning in their gardens gives me much pleasure.

Some gardeners have had their plots offering up bounties of vegetables, fruits and/or flowers and herbs for many, many years while some of our newest members have been out in the spring, creating their own special place in our community garden.

We each have our own way of preparing the soil, planting, protecting the young plants, watering and nurturing our gardens.

I like how this shows our different personalities and the way we were shown. New gardeners are learning some old tricks from practiced folks and we all work to keep our plants healthy without using harmful pesticides. This is just another way that Beaver Creekers can stay near to nature and grow some tasty food.

Co-ops welcome Liberal commitments on energy retrofits and promise of more housing announcements

I just got this email blast from the Cooperative Housing Federation of Canada.

Liberal leader Stéphane Dion made an announcement of funding to help co-op members and other Canadians renovate their homes to conserve energy. The event took place at Pine Ridge Housing Co-operative in Burnaby, which is exploring the option of converting to thermal heating. In a discussion with housing co-op members, the Liberal leader also promised to reveal his plans for social and co-op housing later in the campaign.

This promise addresses one of the key issues CHF Canada and housing co-ops are raising in this election.

CHF Canada welcomes this major announcement and looks forward to hearing more from all parties during this campaign.

Unique Student Housing Co-Op Uses Unique Fundraising Drive

The GRAND HOUSE project

The Grand House Student Co-operative, in Cambridge, ON, is nearing completion. It is one of the first university student housing co-ops to be developed in many years. Its large house will accommodate 12 students. The building itself is on the cutting-edge of environmental design including using straw bale construction. The co-op has launched a Buy-a-Bale campaign to raise funds to help it complete the project. For more on the co-op, its unique construction, or its campaign, go to www.grandhouse.wacsa.org.

Bugs of Beaver Creek: Stink Bugs

Stink Bug

Though people commonly refer to all insects as bugs, entomologically the term is reserved for a specific group of insects called “true bugs”. These insects have characteristic needle-like mouthparts that stab and suck the liquefied contents from other organisms like a straw. They form a large order of insects called Hemiptera, which includes a particularly pungent bunch of bugs:

Stink Bugs

Coming in a range of colours and patterns, the shield-shaped stink bugs can be quite an attractive lot of insects. Unfortunately for us (but fortunately for them), they stink!

Bugs of Beaver Creek: Ants

Ant

I use the term “bugs” in the title to encompass all insects, arachnids, and other non-insect arthropods. Bugs pollinate our plants, mix and aerate our soil, dispose of carrion and dung, feed on pests and provide food for other life forms. In return, many of us fear them, swat or squish them, spray them with poisons, or at best ignore them. It must be said that we depend upon bugs far more than they depend on us. Indeed, if they were to suddenly disappear it is doubtful whether the human species would be able to survive as we do, if at all.

There is a group of insects that has colonized almost every terrestrial habitat on the planet, and consequently there are a lot of them here at Beaver Creek. They were the first insect I sighted this spring and are fascinating animals if you take a closer look:

Oak, Quercus

Giant oak with man.

Beaver Creek has three varieties of oak. The oaks along the road are red oaks. The oak between Block Five and Block Six is a white oak. And the oak in the field beside Block Nine is a bur oak. There is also a bur oak near the fire pit and in among the sumac behind Block Two.

In his book, Oak: The Frame of Civilization, William Logan emphasizes the critical relationship humanity has had with oak since the ending of the last ice ages about 15,000 years ago. This is an excellent book and is available from the library, call number 634.9721. Most of the information in this article is extracted from this book.